Best Bread Makers in 2020

1

Oster Expressbake 2-Pound CKSTBRTW20 Bread Maker

Wake up to the aroma of freshly baked bread with the Oster Express bake Bread Machine. Designed to make up to a 2 pound family sized loaf, this bread maker comes with its own tested recipes for ultimate perfection.

  • Product
  • Photos
  • Last reviews

Oster Bread Maker | Expressbake, 2-Pound Loaf

Wake up to the aroma of freshly baked bread with the Oster Express bake Bread Machine. Designed to make up to a 2 pound family sized loaf, this bread maker comes with its own tested recipes for ...
Available: In stock
< $71.16 89.99
Buy this item
amazon amazon.com
In this review I will compare Oster CKSTBRW20 and Zojirushi BB-PAC20.Background:For the last six months I have been making various type of breads using my Oster bread maker.Since getting a bread machine I have stopped buying bread.I use the machine every 2-3 days to make 1.5 loaf to my family. Bakes such as bagel`s for example require me to take the dough out, shape it and etc.In my opinion to much work and therefore I have not used the machine for these bake goods and I purchase those.The recipes I used are turnkey where I put all ingredients in the machine and press a button. Any recipes which require additional steps (with exception to sourdough are not my forte)So far I had excellent results, however I was tempting to see if there is added value in a “better” machine which should produce better results.Two key things which were of interest for in in the Zoj were;1. Preheat of ingredients prior for mixinga. In many cases I make breads which require milk and/or eggs. These I keep in the fridge and when added they are COLD. When using my Oster I would add a 30 min extra to timer to allow ingredients to come to room temp , however in many cases they are still cooler than they should2. Long shapea. It is a pain in the A## to cut the bread Oster produce. The shape does not allow for easy to produce and consume sandwich slices. In addition it is hard to find a decent bread box which will fit the 1.5 loaf let alone 2lb loaf. When making soft fluffy loafs this is becoming a real issue.Today I got the new BB-PAC20 and my initial impression compare to Oster:• Zoj is heavier then Oster• Zoj is twice and take twice the counter space as Oster• Due to size of Zoj it is there to say where Oster can be stored and be used when and as needed.• Zoj stops when lid is opened, which can be bothersome (my kid like to watch the bread getting mixed)• Zoj seems to be better constructed.• Zoj does not shift on counter when mixing due to its weight (My Oster already crushed to the floor once which required me to take it apart and put all the buttons and display back where they should be)• Zoj have much better handles the Oster ( I removed the handle from my Oster , as in some cases high raise breads will “stick” to the handle and will challenge the loaf removal as the bread will stick to handle )• Zoj looks “better” as its stainless and black finish vs white (which look dated).Baking;I took a basic sweet bread (with egg`s) recipe and prepared the same recipe side by side on both units.For both recipes I used same ingredients and same measurement cups, all in all beside the machine all other parameters are identical.This test would allow me to test and see if there is added value for the high premium of the Zoj ($200 more the Oster) and see if the money and counter space are well spent here.** See pictures for difference between Zoj and Oster during mixing and baking, as well for product produced **This test is for BASIC functionality and used basic cycle with medium crust settings.Results:Crust – Both units were set to medium. Zoj product a thicker darker crust. Zoj crust is more consistent where Oster has lighter top then its sides.Shape – As expected Zoj products longer and “lower” loaf which is easier to cut. Zoj loaf had two “bumps” due to its design of two mixing blades.Texture – Zoj have more consistent texture where air “bubbles” are spread more evenly. Blades leave smaller hole in bread due to lower profile .Taste – better “crunch” in Zoj , beside this both taste same to me.My $0.02 :If you children like bread with no crust Oster might be better, where if you like thicker crust with more crunch Zoj would be better.If you intend to keep the bread machine on your counter Zoj will be more appealing due to design and color. If you plan to keep it in cabinet Oster is a better choice due to size and weight.Zoj product a better product but by a very small margin, is it worth the extra $200 is all depend on the value of $200 to you.If I will keep Zoj it will only be due to the loaf size and shape, all other to me is relative equal.
This is basically a very good little machine; BUT, if you do happen to get a defective machine that lasts past the Amazon return date (30 days) and have a problem Jardin, the parent company will basically do NOTHING for you. I bought my SECOND, identical bread maker to replace an older unit that had served well for a couple of years but had finally failed, on June 11, 2017. The new unit failed yesterday, November 9. About 10 minutes into the mixing cycle, the machine stopped, beeped continuously and displayed Error code EEE, temperature sensing circuit failure.I called Jardine on their 800 number and after some troubleshooting, was told that the problem was that the room temperature was too high and that this caused the error. We re-set the error code by holding down the on/off button; something that I had already tried unsuccessfully when the unit initially failed. Because I felt the problem was intermittent failure and not room temperature (at the time 70 degrees on sunny fall, California day), I asked them to replace the machine because the problem was obviously intermittent and the machine was only five months old. I was politely told no.
I use this on average once a week. It replaces an old Oster which was over 10 years old, which I took as a recommendation for the brand. It is clearly more cheaply made that the old one - lighter overall and with a much thinner pan, and the kneading motor really sounds like it's straining (but it does the job OK). I bake a couple of different but basic loaves - one with raisins added during the rise cycle. I am very pleased with the results.Note: for the bread with raisins, I add them gradually immediately the second mix/knead starts, and do not wait another 5+ minutes for the beeps; I found that they did not mix into the dough very well when I waited for the beeps, and they do not get mashed up due to me adding them sooner.However, after only a few months the paddle lost its non-stick quality. Originally it just slipped out of the loaf when removing the loaf from the pan or came out very easily if it stayed in the loaf. Now (6 months old) it just seems to have almost no non-stick quality at all - see pictures. It does not appear to have lost its surface coating. It has never been scoured or mistreated - only washed with a sponge, as recommended. The same problem also applies to the studs at the bottom of the pan, although this is not really any problem from a bread removal or usability viewpoint.UPDATE: Customer service is first class; everything replaced with no question. I've up-rated the product to 5 stars on the assumption that I had a 1-off issue, and will revise again in future if the problem recurs.

Features

  • 650 watts oster bread maker with upto a 2.0 pound loaf capacity is ideal for larger families
  • 12 bread settings and 3 crust settings for making a variety of breads, dough, and jams
  • Expressbake setting bakes bread in under an hour

2

Panasonic SD-YD250 Automatic Bread Maker

There’s nothing quite like the warm aroma of freshly baked homemade bread from the oven. With the help of this user-friendly bread machine, even those with a busy, on-the-go schedule can enjoy this simple pleasure–without the time-consuming hard work normally associated with baking bread. Just add ingredients, press a few buttons, and it takes care of the rest.

  • Product
  • Photos
  • Last reviews
I own this Panasonic bread machine as well as the Cuisinart CBK-100. I've made hundreds of loaves of bread with each unit over the past several years. I know the quirks of each machine well. Here is a quick rundown on my observations:- Best for good-looking bread: Cuisinart. The Panasonic machine tends to create not-presentation-worthy bread. Don't know why. If I'm making a loaf for a friend, I use the Cuisinart machine. If it's just for me, I use the Panasonic.- Best for durability: Panasonic. The Cuisinart bread pan wears out much faster than the Panasonic's. I'm on my third pan and at $40 a pop, they're not cheap. Also, the Cuisinart machine has developed a squeaking during mixing/kneading. But note that I use these machines daily and if you're an occasional user, you may not wear it out as fast.- Best for cleanliness: Cuisinart. the Panasonic machine seems to make a mess and many times I've had dough get paddled onto the heating elements, burn, and create awful smoke which is then absorbed by the bread. The inside of the Panasonic also gets filthy fast, including the yeast dispenser, and needs regular cleaning. While the inside of the Cuisinart needs occasional cleaning, the mess it makes is not nearly as bad as the Panasonic.- Best for noise: Cuisinart. While its beeps are loud and can be annoying, the Panasonic is too quiet. If I'm in another room, the beeps are hard to hear.- Best for size/weight: Cuisinart. It's slightly smaller and lighter.- Best for speed: Cuisinart. The Panasonic rests the bread ingredients for an hour before starting. The Cuisinart gets right to work. I haven't noticed any benefits with Panasonic's rest feature (or its yeast dispenser for that matter).- Best for included recipes: Cuisinart. They're comprehensive and, for the most part, very good.- Best instruction manual: Cuisinart. It seems to go into more detail about the bread making process. The Panasonic is easier to read with more graphics, but the Cuisinart manual is more informative.While I prefer the Cuisinart in the end, I recommend weighing the pros and cons of each one and decide which works best for you. I would give the Panasonic four stars, but the dough occasionally being paddled onto the heating elements and creating smoke which then gets into the bread gives me some concern.
I always thought a breadmaker was something you bought, used for a month, and then put in a cupboard never to see the light of day again. To the contrary, once I started making my own bread, the execution is easy, and the thought of going back to store-bought horrible. I have made at least one loaf of bread every. single. week since purchase in Jan 2011.This breadmaker cost a bit more when I bought it, about $160, so on a per-use basis, it's working out to about $0.44/loaf. Pretty good.**Update 12/3/17 - my (now) seven-year old SD-YD250 committed suicide by walking off the counter. Yup, it walks from time to time. What a crash it made. I order a replacement immediately and am SO happy that Panasonic is still making them. Literally not a detail has been changed - it was delivered in the same sturdy outer plain cardboard box, with the inner color printed box with the heavy duty copper staples holding it closed, with the exact same literature. It's so shiny and new though !!!How many consumer electronics these days are still being made seven years later ???
I had purchased a similar model years ago while my 3 kids were small. It worked very well and thought I'd try the same thing again because it's hard for me to get out and shop. Well, this particular machine has a few drawbacks VS my previous machine. Also the price as in most anything has basically skyrocketed over the last probably 15 years since my first machine. The problem with my new one is that if you don't clean it perfectly especially where the yeast goes in it can plug up. Moisture or yeast stuck in the edges of where it dumps in can prevent the yeast from emptying completely. This is a death sentence for the bread. It won't mix into it properly causing the bread not to rise properly producing a deflated loaf of bread that you can't salvage much from. I also have seen a lack of complete mixing of the ingredients. After the baking cycle you can end up with flour or other things trapped along the outsides of the loaf. As I encounter these problems I am learning what to do or not do in order to have a decent loaf of bread. I have also began using medium and large instead of the default extra large setting. I believe it has helped in the blending and rising processes without so much material to mix perfectly etc.As far as decent bread goes when it works properly the bread is quite good. I haven't used it for any other functions other than to bake bread. This was the only machine I found under $100.00 or less. Most were $150.00 on up but didn't have any obvious benefits over this. The instructions for making bread or other things were a little confusing. The measurements were given in oz. Tbs. Cups and off to the left it would say measurement by weight is more accurate for things like flour and such. It really was confusing until I figured out they were specifying by weight rather than volume. Considering I don't have a scale as such to weigh food I try and stick with the volume measurements I'm most familiar with. I get in trouble when I'm asked to measure something like 13/16th of a cup so I try to figure out the closest measurement I'm familiar with and mark it in the book.I do think it will be generally OK eventually once I figure everything out. I don't believe it has any actual problems per say, just some idiosyncrasies that are taking some getting used to. Call it a learning curve I didn't have with my previous bread machine.

Features

  • 3 choices of loaf sizes and up to 2-1/2 pounds loaf capacity, ideal bread machine for modern family
  • Settings for white, whole wheat, multigrain, French, quick breads/cakes
  • 13-hour delay start timer and programmable menu options make meal planning easier

3

Cuisinart CBK-100 2lb Bread Maker

Wake up to the smell of freshly baked bread with this programmable bread machine. Simply add the ingredients, choose from several options using the touch-pad controls, and it takes care of the rest. It will mix the ingredients, knead the dough, let it rise, and bake it to perfection–soft on the inside and crispy on the outside.

  • Product
  • Photos
  • Last reviews

Cuisinart CBK-100 2 LB Bread Maker,Compact Automatic

Wake up to the smell of freshly baked bread with this programmable bread machine. Simply add the ingredients, choose from several options using the touch-pad controls, and it takes care of the rest. ...
Available: In stock
< $98.99
Buy this item
amazon amazon.com
The initial attraction of this machine was aesthetics - small footprint and appliance matching. I was concerned that the vertical loaf would not bake evenly, but decided to give it a try and am glad that I did. Loaves are thoroughly and evenly baked even on the light crust setting. I appreciate the fact that the mixer paddle design is such that about 95% of the time the paddle is left in the pan when a loaf is removed, so no more digging in a hot loaf to remove the paddle. After trying both normal and rapid yeast, have settled on the rapid setting for those recipes that allow it. The best bread machine I have had in 25 years of using bread machines.
My wife loves this machine! There is nothing compact about it. This makes making bread a breeze, just add the ingredients, press a button and voila you will be enjoying bread in 4 hours, only bad thing is smelling bread bake all day and making you hungry
I'm making my 4th loaf now (whole wheat) and I expect it'll come out as great as my previous 3 since I bought it. I don't eat much bread but when I do I prefer whole grain breads so it's cheaper (and more fun) to make them myself and the Cuisinart bread machine is excellent, like all my other Cuisinart kitchen gadgets.My favorite loaves are the rustic Spanish and Italian plus I enjoy using the pizza dough feature for homemade Romesco or Roasted Garlic-Red Pepper pesto pizzas...The price was exceptional also, compared to years ago when bread machines were a 'fad' and the going prices were outrageous and exorbitant.

Features

  • Programmable bread machine bakes 1-, 1-1/2-, and 2-pound loaves
  • 12 preprogrammed menu options; 3 crust settings; 13-hour delay-start timer
  • Viewing window; removable lid, pan, and paddle for quick cleanup

4

Zojirushi BB-PAC20 Home Bakery Virtuoso Bread Maker

Get performance like you’ve never seen from a breadmaker. A revolutionary heating element built into our Home Bakery Virtuoso Breadmaker changes the way you can bake bread at home.

  • Product
  • Photos
  • Last reviews

Zojirushi BB-PAC20BA BB-PAC20 Home Bakery Virtuoso Breadmaker with Gluten Free Menu setting

Make sure this fits by entering your model number.; Bakes a large traditional rectangular shaped 2-pound loaf; Gluten Free and Custom Menu settings will accommodate gluten free and organic baking ...
Available: In stock
< $149.99
Buy this item
amazon amazon.com
My mom and I spent 5 days comparing the reviews and articles on the Zojirushi BB-PAC20 and Breville BBM800XL. We finally ended up comparing both models side by side because a friend has the Breville. For us, it ultimately boiled down to these key features:Zojirishi:+Longer loaf tub (makes a more normal sized loaf like you'd buy at the store+Heating element in the lid for consistent and even browning all aroundBreville:+4 loaf sizes+Nut dispenserPICTURE DESCRIPTIONS: First loaf we baked was white bread (regular speed, medium crust). I could have shaped it more evenly so it wasn't taller in the middle. Notice how small the holes are since I removed the paddles. The loaf in plastic wrap is wheat bread from the grocery store. Also compare it to a mostly eaten white bread made from the Breville. See how the top is much lighter than the sides? The Breville doesn't have a top heating element. Second bread we made was olive bread from an online recipe. I shaped this one better, also the recipe called for 2 tsp yeast instead of 2.5. Again I compared it to the size of a regular bread from the grocery store (half the bread is missing from the plastic bag).Neutral points:+Breville has a much nicer user interface. Pretty surprising Zojirushi has an interface that looks like it's from the early 2000s. But ultimately, our decision is going to be purely about bread quality.+Zojirushi allows you to create 3 custom profiles in which you can adjust the timings for each phase (Rest->Knead->Shape->Rise1->Rise2-Rise3->Bake->Keep Warm) whereas the Breville allows you to create 9 custom profiles and adjust the timings AND temperature for each phase (Knead 1->Knead 2->Rise 1->Rise 2->Rise 3->Keep Warm).We realized we didn't care too much about the number of custom profiles, because for most bread, the tried and tested standard settings provided by both machines are already sufficient.+The Zojirushi has a "Shape" option where it will beep before the first rise phase and give you an hour to open the lid, take the dough out and shape it with your hands so it looks nice and even, put it back and then close the machine. Don't recall the Breville having this specific feature, but realized it doesn't matter because the ideal shape time is right after the last punch down phase. More on that later.+The Zojirushi has 2 paddles and the Breville has one. The number of paddles isn't specifically a benefit in either machine's favor. It is more of a result of each machine's tub shape. The Breville is narrower and taller, and the Zojirushi is shorter and long. I think that the tub shape goes in favor of the Zojirushi, as I mentioned earlier.+Breville has foldable paddles. Don't really care, because we remove the paddles before the final rise even on the Zojirushi, so the holes are super small (1 centimeter diameter)+The Zojirushi has much sturdier build quality, whereas the Breville is made of thin, unpolished brushed aluminum. As others have noted, it dents very easily. In fact, our Breville arrived with a dent in it. Again, not too big a deal. Ultimately which one makes better bread?+Breville looks more modern and sleek. Zojirushi looks like a typical appliance.+Zojirushi makes less noise. At its loudest, it has the deep droning sound of a washing machine. Breville makes a banging noise as the paddles spin..which is pretty loud.+Zojirushi says it can be used for meatloaf and sourdough starter, Breville has a yeast free option or something...personally I don't care, plus you can probably customize settings on the Breville to make those work. (Just look up online instruction manuals from either companies to see what their timings are for each setting, and you can custom program that timing into the other machine)+Breville has a light you can turn on when peeking through the viewing window. I use my phone's flashlight when using the Zojirushi (though you can kinda see what's going on without it)+The nut dispenser was a pretty awesome get sure in favor of the Breville, but I want to point out that the Zojirushi will beep when it's time to add those ingredients. The automation is missing from the Zojirushi. So this isn't a neutral point - it's a big win for the Breville. But I wanted to point out the beeping of the Zojirushi as an FYI.+The Breville's marketing material goes out of its way to mention the punch down phase, but in fact not machines have this. Right before Rise 2 and Rise 3, the paddle (s) spins slowly a bunch of times in order to let trapped air escape out of the dough.+The Breville has 2 programmable knead phases. The Zojirushi has 1. I don't understand what this is about...They both knead for the appropriate amount of time, so maybe the Breville just let's you get more detailed about the process if you want? If both bake great bread, then I really don't care either way.+The Zojirushi has an optional rest phase in which it allows all your ingredients to come to room tepremature for optimal baking. Don't recall the Breville has this. On both machines, you can always skip a step if you want (on the Breville, you hold down the start button, on the Zojirushi you hold down the up and down buttons on Select Course, if I recall correctly...it's in the manual)Okay, so what was our verdict?Well, it ultimately came down purely to bread quality, and here the Zojirushi is the winner. Just check out the pictures I uploaded. The browning is ridiculously consistent on all sides of the bread. Not overly chewy on one end of another. I have to attribute this to the Zojirushi's heating element in the lid, since I suspect the Breville ends up heating the sides and bottom longer in order to give the top a sufficient amount of browning.The Zojirushi also has a spectacular loaf size. The first time around, it was a bit high. But check out the olive bread we made on the second try...compared to a regular loaf you'd buy at a store, the size is spot on. I put a ruler next to the white bread pics so you can see. However, the white bread was our absolute first loaf we tried, and we could've done one or two things to make it as perfectly formed as the olive bread (see below).Loaf size was an important factor for us, because we want regular sized slices that fit in our toaster. With the Breville, you might be able to achieve these sizes by using a lower bread loaf setting and adjusting the amount of ingredients. But you'll end up with less bread. While we really liked the ability to choose multiple bread sizes with the Breville, we liked that the Zojirushi makes a standard looking loaf right out of the box. And we found out that the recipe book does show you how to make 1.5lb sized loaves of wheat bread and some others.So how did we make the perfect looking bread you'll see in the pics?Tips:1) Read the instruction manual precisely and/or watch the first part of the DVD (liquids first, dry things second, make a little pocket for the yeast, and be EXACT for the ingredient measurements)2) SHAPE YOUR DOUGH AND REMOVE PADDLES: Use the instruction manual to identify when the last punch down phase will begin. For the white bread regular setting, this should be 55 minutes after the Knead phase ends. The knead phase was 19 minutes and the Rest 30...so that means you should set an alarm to get back to your machine 1 hour and 44 minutes after pressing the start button. At that time, you will hear the paddles making one rotation every few seconds. It does this about 15 times. As soon as it stops doing this, it means the final rise phase will begin. Open the machine (it automatically pauses where it is in the process), and take the dough out with your hands. Put it on a table or mat or something (maybe parchment paper that is lubricated with olive oil - that's what I did), and roll the dough a bit and shape it with your hands so it looks nice and smooth. Better is if you shape it to look like a rectangle that will fit the tub perfectly, and flatten it a bit so it has an even night all the way. Then, remove the paddles (they are slippery so use something that has a good grip to pull them out). Put your loaf back in so it takes the full space of the tub, maybe pat it down one last time, and close the machine. Your bread will have a great shape.+Bonus tip: one of the reviewers mentioned putting your paddles in the same orientation before putting in the ingredients. Not sure if it helped, but I definitely did this. I pointed both my paddles in the 6 o'clock position.The first recipe we used was the Basic White Bread Regular (meaning we used active dry yeast instead of fast/instant yeast). Medium crust setting, except we left it in for 5 minutes extra after it was done to let it brown more.The second recipe we used is some southern olive bread recipe I googled in which they happened to use a Zojirushi as well! I used the dark crust setting and took it out immediately. Here's the "Kalamata Olive Bread Recipe from Southernfood/Aboutfood : http://southernfood.about.com/od/breadmachine/r/r70412a.htmDon't forget to let your bread sit for 30 minutes before slicing!Bottom line: The Zojirushi's even browning and standard loaf size make me feel it makes an overall better bread loaf. Check out the pics!After seeing the modern look, cool interface, and more granular programmable control of the Breville (e.g. temperature control) I want to take one star away from this machine. I may not use all those features, but maybe I would! But c'mon - it's the 21st century. Great looking user interfaces should be standard.
Let me start by saying I make the most delicious perfect bread. I have yet to find any bread that even comes close to what I make at home by hand. But bread is exhausting to make so I don't get to make it as often as I like. I tried the bread machine craze years ago and was utterly disappointed. Bread came out with hard crusts, collapsed tops and a spongy texture that was nothing short of gross. I thought I would try again and bought the Cuisinart CBK-200. Same results, hard crust, bad texture and different results everytime. I found myself making loaf after loaf trying to "tweak" recipes to get a descent loaf. The cuisinart went back and I bought the Zojirushi. The first loaf was made straight from the book, following the exact recipe and I have to tell you it came out near perfect. The crust was soft but firm with a beautiful color, the texture of the bread was soft, moist and tight. More importantly, the taste was excellent. The closest I have come to my own recipes I have only made one loaf so far and I threw it together very quickly with no effort at all and the results were amazing. If the loaves stay consistent, I found a serious contender for my homemade bread. My only gripe is the 2lb loaf is very tall and makes for a big sandwich, it also makes it difficult to store such a tall loaf. Will update again after making a few more loaves.**Found a gripe** The menus display does not light up so it is impossible to read if you are short. I have to get a flashlight to make sure I choose the right cycle. I have chosen quick bread a few times now instead or regular and gotten flat bread.**Update 9/3/2016**Still works great every single time! No complaints whatsoever...get this machine, worth every penny!**Update 11/5/15**I have also made the lemon pound cake recipe from the book. Again throwing all ingredients in and pressing start. No cleaning bowls or mixers or spoons. The recipe is excellent, the cake is moist and surprisingly light. The crust is a little thick on the bottom and sides but I did have the machine set to medium crust. So far everything I have thrown in the machine has come out perfect. No learning curve, no tweaking and no adjustments needed to be made. Everything comes out right the first time.**Update 12/12/15**Still a great machine. I Use it a couple of times a week for bread and cakes. Where this machine really shines is dough. I use it to make french bread dough (which needs to be very wet and stretchy) and this machine makes a great french bread dough. Also brioche dough, butter dough, pizza dough. They have all been perfect. I find myself making more homemade rolls like hamburger buns because the dough is so easy.
We have owned several bread machines, some good, some not so much. Recent ones were all mediocre at best and short lived. We decided to splurge on this one and it was no mistake. Still going strong after 4 years, although we recently replaced a paddle - ordered and received 4 days later (good luck trying to find parts for most other brands). Considering how much we've used this machine, we have no complaints - by far the best we've ever owned. It is very ruggedly built and I expect to be using it for many years yet. It turned out not to be so much of a splurge after all when you consider the previous 2 brands we tried lasted less than 2 years. Makes excellent, well formed loaves, even when throwing in extra ingredients (basil, cheese, etc.) part way through a cycle. I also use it a lot for making various doughs for baguettes, buns and more. If you're considering a cheaper machine, think again; this one will save you money in the long run. HIGHLY recommended.

Features

  • Bakes a large traditional rectangular shaped 2-pound loaf; Gluten Free and Custom Menu settings will accommodate gluten free and organic baking ingredients.
  • Bakes a large traditional rectangular shaped 2-pound loaf;Electrical Rating:120 volts
  • Dual kneading blades to knead the dough thoroughly.

5

Sunbeam 58912-Pound Programmable Bread Maker

Bake fresh, artisan-style bread at home with the Sunbeam Programmable Bread Maker. With its user-friendly design and 12 cooking functions, this convenient bread machine helps you bake a wide variety of breads–from cinnamon raisin bread to buttery dinner rolls.

  • Product
  • Photos
  • Last reviews

Sunbeam Programmable Bread Maker, White

Bake fresh, artisan-style bread at home with the Sunbeam Programmable Bread Maker. With its user-friendly design and 12 cooking functions, this convenient bread machine helps you bake a wide variety ...
< $89.99
Buy this item
amazon amazon.com
This is my first ever bread machine and let me preface that by saying I do not like to bake as a rule. What I do like is bread of any type as a snack and with meals - bread is simply my favorite food - I'll choose it over sweets every time. I have recently been diagnosed with a severe adult onset allergy to both soy and eggs, so this has put a dent in eating anything made commercially or at the local bakeries - no more store bought bread, rolls, etc for me. In desperation I decided to learn to make my own and figured I would buy the least complicated, least expensive bread machine on the market with the best reputation - I got this one from the Amazon warehouse. My theory was if I hate doing this then I'm not out a huge amount of cash in the overall experiment. Well, it's been almost three weeks and I've made 12 different loaves so far with great success and almost no trouble at all.This machine is extremely easy to use and relatively uncomplicated. The book is pretty simple and straight forward to understand - though the recipes in it aren't to my liking personally, that's just an individual taste issue. The buttons are large and easy to operate & the LCD screen is clear once you read the book and know what each code means. It is a bit hard to see without good light though. My unit came with a plastic cup for flour and a one piece combo teaspoon/tablespoon for salt & sugar.I am using King Arthur Bread Flour only and Fleishmann's bread machine yeast in the jar (I know there are other yeasts out there, but as a newbie, I went with what 3 of my experienced bread baking friends suggested) and I have absolutely no problems at all with any of my breads rising or correctly or having the right texture when cooked. I have also followed the tip of lightly wiping the paddle with a bit of oil before use so that it slips out of my finished loaf easily. The machine does beep after the first rise before it kneads a second time so you can drop your add-ins in before the second mix/knead session. I've done a loaf of bacon-beer-cheese bread, adding the bacon & shredded cheese in this way and everything incorporated into the dough perfectly. (I felt like a magician putting homemade bacon bread on the table and watching my husband's eyes bug out!)I am still learning something every time I use this machine, but it has earned a permanent place on my counter top and for now anyway, I cannot see any reason to spend more money and buy a two hundred dollar version. I can put the ingredients in an have hot, fresh, soft bread ready in three hours or a slightly denser loaf in an hour on the the quick bake setting. Now that I've got the basics down pat it only takes about 10 minutes to pull the ingredients out, put them in the machine, turn it on and clean up. Done. This is actually one of my favorite purchases of the past year.******One Year Update Feb 2017 *****I've been making bread on average twice a week with this little machine for a year. It just works right every time with no drama. I have only had one loaf fail to rise correctly and it turned out that I had used 1/2 the yeast needed....so my fault.I've made cranberry bread, pumpkin bread, peanut butter bread and your usual cheese or nut breads without any issues. The best though is buttermilk bread - it always ends up with a creamy, soft texture that is a big hit as a hostess gift. I would absolutely buy this bread machine again.
I've been the victim of so many kitchen gadgets, filled with empty promises. I am usually so, so, so disappointed. One day, I heard tell of a magical device called, -A Breadmaker-. It sounded too good to be true. Surely, an art such as break making cannot be replicated by a machine?! And so I researched and read and eventually added this to my wishlist. But memories of gadgets past kept me from making my purchase. Then, on Christmas morning, I find myself face to face with this myth, in the flesh! (kinda). I searched my cabinets and found I had what I needed for a loaf of french bread. With great trepidation, I set it and let it go. Soon, my home was filled with the delicious aroma of fresh bread. Could it be? Could the legends be true? I easily released the bread from its pan and took a bite.HOLEY GUACAMOLE I MADE BREAD BY DUMPING SOME CRAP IN A BOWL AND STICKING IT IN A MACHINE AND GOING TO PLAY VIDEO GAMES.I've made all the breads in the recipe book and have a folder full or recipes to try. I've used the timer to wake up to fresh bread.I. LOVE. THIS. THING.-sobs while stroking bread maker-
I have used bread machines for over 20 years and this is the first one I've had that doesn't require digging out the paddle from the baked loaf. Even after over 10 loaves the bread comes out clean and paddle free. My tried and true whole wheat recipes have turned out great. I bought a "like new" one for $45 and it came in the original packaging and looked brand new. Very pleased.

Features

  • Bakes up to a 2 lb loaf of bread
  • 13 hour delay bake and 12 baking functions
  • Express Bake cycle

Tags:

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

Xtra Shopp